Exploring the shot blasting process - Simulation helps create perfect surface finishes for raw castings

Example of a simulation that displays the blast results in a work piece batch after different time intervals.
Example of a simulation that displays the blast results in a work piece batch after different time intervals.
Simulation of a single piece shot blast job with rotation and linear movement of the work piece
Simulation of a single piece shot blast job with rotation and linear movement of the work piece

In the foundry industry many production processes are developed by the use of simulations. But the actual casting phase is followed by further manufacturing stages adding value to the raw work pieces. One such operation is the surface refinement by shot blasting and mass finishing as offered by the Rösler company. Both technologies are cleaning the castings and generate precisely defined surface characteristics.

The development of shot blasting systems and the underlying shot blasting processes is mostly based on decades of experience and knowhow. In its efforts to further refine these processes and improve their efficiency, the Rösler Oberflächentechnik is utilizing various simulation software modules and adapting them to specific surface refinement targets. With the modified software the achievable work piece surface finishes can now be demonstrated. Furthermore, it allows simulating various treatment modes such as single piece or batch processing, where the work pieces are tumbling over each other. The knowledge gained by such simulations provides valuable information about the optimal arrangement of the blast media acceleration systems like turbines or blast nozzles in relation to the work pieces to be blasted.

With the software such processes as blast cleaning, cosmetic blasting, blast chipping and shot peening can be demonstrated. It also allows the simulation of different work piece transport systems to analyze the mixing and shot blast effect in work piece batches, where the work pieces are tumbling over each other.

The simulations have shown that the blast performance of actual shot blast processes can be improved by 20 to 30%. Such improvements are directly reflected in shorter cycle times and reduced energy consumption.